Do Bunions Always Need Surgery Treatment?

Overview

Bunions

If you?ve developed a solid bump at the base of your big toe along with pain and swelling, it?s possible that you have a bunion. According to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) A bunion is an enlargement of the joint at the base of the big toe-the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, that forms when the bone or tissue at the big toe joint moves out of place. This forces the toe to bend toward the others, causing an often painful lump of bone on the foot. Since this joint carries a lot of the body?s weight while walking, bunions can cause extreme pain if left untreated. The MTP joint itself may become stiff and sore, making even the wearing of shoes difficult or impossible. Bunions, from the Latin ?bunio,? meaning enlargement, can also occur on the outside of the foot along the little toe, where it is called a ?bunionette? or ?tailor?s bunion.?

Causes

Causes of bunions and risk factors for bunions include a family tendency to bunions may make them more likely to develop. Arthritis of the foot, if it affects walking, it can make bunions more likely to develop. Neuromuscular problems, such as cerebral palsy. Biomechanical factors, such as low arches, flat feet and hypermobile joints, can increase the risk. Wearing shoes that are too tight, too narrow and with pointed toes will exacerbate symptoms if bunions are present. Wearing high heels will also exacerbate existing bunions. Women are more prone to bunions than men.

Symptoms

With Bunions, a person will have inflammation, swelling, and soreness on the side surface of the big toe. Corns most commonly are tender cone-shaped patches of dry skin on the top or side of the toes. Calluses will appear on high-pressure points of the foot as thick hardened patches of skin.

Diagnosis

Your doctor is very likely to be able to diagnose your bunion simply by examining your foot. Even before that, he or she will probably ask about your family and personal medical history and evaluate the types of shoes you wear. You'll be asked about your symptoms, when they started and when they occur. You may also be asked to flex your toe so that your doctor can get an idea of your range of motion. He or she may order x-rays in order to determine the extent of your deformity.

Non Surgical Treatment

Bunions may be treated with proper shoes and corrective inserts such as toe spacers, bunion or toe separators, as well as bunion cushions and splints. In extreme cases, surgery may be needed to remove the bony enlargement of the first metatarsal bone, realigning the bone, or straightening the big toe.

Bunions Hard Skin

Surgical Treatment

If the above simple measures do not make you comfortable, an operation may improve the situation. An operation will not give you an entirely normal foot, but it will correct the deformity of the big toe and narrow your foot back towards a more desirable shape. There are a lot of different operations for bunions, depending on the severity of the deformity, the shape of your foot and whether arthritis has developed in the big toe joint. An orthopaedic surgeon who specialises in foot & ankle surgery can advise you on the best operation for your foot. However, an operation may not make your foot narrow enough to wear tight shoes, nor can it fully restore the strength of the big toe.

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